Obama, Israel, Palestine and Peace

If the wealthy of this world really want peace, they should help negotiate and finance Israel’s purchase of the lands Israel deems necessary to its security and continued existence. Anything less is futile.

A political “solution” will not last. Land ownership is the answer. Ownership is clear cut, with no waffling and posturing and broken promises brought on by current affairs, oil prices, and elections.

Carlos Slim, Bill Gates, Warren Buffett, Bernard Arnault, Larry Ellison, the Sultan of Brunei and his peers–the Royal Families of the Muslim world–and the all the world’s religions must negotiate on Israel’s behalf and put money on the table.

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Canada Should Get it Right for Its Own Good

When Canadian politicians encounter budgetary shortfalls and overruns, they often propose privatizing public services (such as public transportation). In other words, they sell their publicly owned transportation facilities and energy producing facilities to private for-profit corporations. For example, in 1998, the Legislative Assembly of Ontario passed the Energy Competition Act, which privatized and broke up the taxpayer-owned crown corporation Ontario Hydro.

The problem in Canada is that compared to the United States, there is NO competition, and that lack of competition in Canada invariably means that prices rise when public taxpayer-owned corporations are sold off. (A few people get rich while the average taxpayer becomes poorer.)

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British Columbia Should Get it Right For It’s Own Good

I have always thought that if British Columbia really had it on the ball, it would make itself over as a fisheries, forestry, and wildlife management park. In other words, British Columbia would get itself designated as a special provincial or national park, a park in which planners, ethicists, scientists, and economists would test ecological and business management plans, models, and techniques, over both the short and long term, and often side by side. For example, various runs of salmon on various sections of the coast would experience alternative management regimes.

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Knives: Be Prepared!

If you read “almost any” of the wilderness survival books, you’ll find that they tell you to carry a good fixed-blade knife. The experts recommend the fixed-blade design because they believe it offers a smaller chance of injury — it won’t clamp shut on your fingers. Personally, when I need to travel light on one-day long-distance endurance hikes, I carry a folding multi-tool knife (a Swiss Army knife), but when I’m camping or backpacking, I take along a lightweight fixed-blade tactical knife.

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High-rise Soundproofing

Have you met anyone living in an old high-rise condo apartment building who replaced their carpets with hardwood flooring and then began complaining about the noise coming from the apartment below. Well they took up half the soundproofing when they removed the carpet. Those old high-rise apartments were built with carpets in mind. The builders planned for the carpeting to block sound (and they cut costs that way).

If the neighbors upstairs are going to put in hardwood floors they better expect to hear your TV.

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Migraines and Situps

If you heard that you should isolate your abdominal muscles (abs) by crossing your arms over your chest while doing situps, and now you’re suffering headaches, neck aches, or migraines, then go back to the old way of doing situps: clasp your hands behind your neck, with your elbows and arms out straight in line with your shoulders and back.

Best Places to Comparison Shop for Outdoor Gear Online

I enjoy comparison shopping for adventure products, especially hiking gear. When I keep up with my comparison shopping routine, I know a good price when I see one. You really can save hundreds of dollars when you stay abreast of prices, because then you know a deal when it stares you in the eye. This year I found a brand-new $600 2010 North Face Free Thinker Gore-Tex Pro Shell Rain Jacket/Ski Jacket for $195.

Here are places I visit online for prices and deals on outdoor gear:



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Endurance Training & Long-distance Hikes: Tips & Tricks

The training and nutritive techniques are virtually identical — endurance athletes minimize weight, eat high-calorie, easily digestible carbohydrate gels and fluid proteins, hydrate often, and take electrolytes — but if you compare the numbers (if you can find the numbers), you’ll find that marathoners and long-distance runners outnumber endurance hikers. While an average marathoner might finish a 42.195 kilometer run in about 5 hours, an endurance hiker will often take 11 hours to complete the same distance on rough wilderness trails. Recent mothers, fathers, and young professionals often find that the travel times to worthwhile hiking trails (plus the hiking times) are prohibitive.

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